Menu

SCHOOL OF MAKING MUSIC

Teaching one student at a time.


Single, Triple, Double Tonguing

1) "Single Tonguing",

Play in cut time.  Use the syllables “Tee - Tee - Tee, Ta - Ta - Ta, Tu - Tu - Tu, Da - Da - Da, Du - Du - Du, Thu - Thu - Thu, Lu - Lu - Lu, and Hu - Hu - Hu (breath attacks).”  in the order given for now (you will later be able to mix and match the order as needed).  Make sure you are using pronounced, confident resonating consonants. Practice them at different dynamic levels from very soft attacks to brilliant, crisp attacks and at speeds ranging from slow to quite fast.

Work your way onward through these.  Play perfectly and cleanly.  Speed is a result, not a goal.  Many perfect repetitions will bring about a quicker, lighter delivery.  Stay precise.

Do a few of these before going on to...

2) "Triple Tonguing"

Beginning these step and leap-wise exercises! Goal of all this, one is hard work. To make you’re “Ku” as strong as you’re “Tu” to develop coordination of “triple and double tonguing” patterns.  Use pronounced, strong, resonating consonants as above.  You may want to strongly accent the 'foreign' syllable at first. Play with a metronome start off slow then add more to the tempo, play only  as fast as you can play without losing you’re clear “Ku” or without tripping up on the articulation patters.

Do a few of these before going on. 

3) "Double Tonguing"

Practice whispering “tu-ku tu-ku tu-ku ... “over and over to train the tongue to move in the double tonguing pattern. Very strict and even; use a metronome.  Keep Ku's solid.  Remember: Clarity, then speed. Use pronounced, confident resonating consonants. 

Do a few of these and go on.

4) "Few Notes"

Notes on Tonguing syllables.  Although we have used syllables like Tu and Ku throughout, you will find that the tongue naturally drops in the low register to more of a Ta and Ka.  In the higher register, the tongue will raise, making the syllable more of Tee Kee.  In all cases, make sure the tip of the tongue is not hitting between the lips.  For less percussive attacks, use Du Gu or even Lu Gu for almost no separation. These softer syllables are great in quiet jazz ballads.

After your tongue is strong, you can start to back off, practicing in these more legato styles and softer dynamic levels.

Now, look for applications in your playing and practicing!

Written by JWATTS

Exercise by ITG

Exercise No. 1 (Gah syllable) Play slowly on mouthpiece and trumpet until comfortable. Connect the syllables but make each attack crisp and clean.

Exercise No. 2 The goal is to make the "gahs" equal to the "dahs". Try to keep the pitch exactly the same throughout the exercise.

Exercise No. 3 (slow double tongue) Again, make all attacks as even as possible. Accuracy over speed!

Exercise No. 4 Gradually increase the speed and go as fast as you can. This may be the only time you will ever hear a teacher say this! In order to reach a tempo that is useful, you must constantly try to move forward. Practice this exercise at least several weeks.

It is crucial to practice the following exercises with a metronome. 
Inexpensive metronomes can be purchased for about twenty dollars. Progress charts are indicated to help chart your progress. (Cross out tempo marks as you reach them.) These are merely suggested ranges of tempo marks. It's okay if you need to start slower than indicated or move in smaller steps! Observe all repeats.

Exercise No. 5 Notice the syllables used. It will not be possible to maintain fast speeds in the first ("dahs" only) or second ("gahs") groups, because you are not using both syllables.

Exercise No. 6 This exercise will help your double tongue endurance and increase the number of notes you can double tongue without getting "tongue tied". This is particularly useful in the many cornet solos in our literature.

Exercise No. 7 (1x single tongue, 2x double tongue) Above 140 double tongue only, but still take the repeat. Now we move beyond double tonguing on a single note and must coordinate valve changes and the tongue.

Copyright @ ITG/International Trumpet Guild

 

 

 

Do I have to pratice? Ahh Miss really? How long did you say I should PRACITCE?

I get a lot of students that ask me that question all the time. "How long did you say I should PRATICE? Do I have to practice? What, practice everyday? Ah why Miss?

How do you practice? Some people say to practice for 1 to 3 hrs, others say to practice for 30 to 45 mins. I would say for students age 4-6 you must practice for 15 minutes everyday. Now for students who are the age of 7-13 should practice for 30 minutes. Now if you have a student who is 14-older then 1 hour of practice would be great. As you become a college student or adult you may practice as many minutes or hours you like or what makes you feel good. Now you say how should one practice? We all practice differently and some just need 45 or 1 hours some like to practice for hours. For me I love to practice a total of 3 hours through out the day. I have a friend "Kiku Collins "who plays pro-trumpet, she told me "I don't have time to practice but when I do, I make it a very important practice." I work on what needs more work on then stuff I already know. You practice the way you think is right for yourself. Some people practice for hours others just for 30 to 45 mins. Not one person can have to many method books. You can always find a method book that works for you.

So how do you practice, what do you practice on? That is the question I get a lot from a lot of students. I work on lips slurs, Embouchure ...and things in between. This is for French horn/Trumpet. If for ex: if I had a song I am working on, I find the part of the song that is hard and turn it into a workout for me on my trumpet or I find method books that well help me understand my music.

Other key points to look at is if you are in some type of Jazz band or some other type of band. You are at practice or if you teach music lessons you are still in the practice stage. Like I still my students "Practices and you can go far."

What do you think would make you a better trumpet player? Just because you practice for hours you think it well make you a better trumpet player. No its the fact that you must have a good 1 hour practice to be a better trumpet player. Work on things that need more working on. Like I work on my lip slurs. What do you work on? To become a better trumpet, how I see it is you must first know you well not always get it right the first time ect.. unless you are a great at reading music for the first time. Shot I would said people that can do that are the ones who been playing trumpet for over 30 years. haha! Then once you know what parts on your trumpet, music you need to work on then spend more time working on that then later on the stuff you already know. I had a teacher once told me make your practice the best way that fits you. 

So if you would like to chat or need more advice just send me a message. I well get back to you in one business day!

Steps to a good practice

7 steps to practicing a piece on piano:
 
1. Always check on what Key Signature you are in, rather you are in a Major key or a Minor key, also    make sure to check to see if you have any flat’s (b), sharp’s (#) or natural’s.
2. Next would be what Time Signature you are in, rather its 4/4, 3/4, or 2/4 ect ….
3. Now check on the Tempo it is asking for, like “Adagio, Andante, Moderato and or Allegro" ect …  
4. For Piano Player’s start with just your Right Hand until you get it down solid with a comfortable           tempo so start off with like a very slow tempo.
5. Then next step is just Left Hand, until you get that down solid with a comfortable tempo.
6. Then go ahead and use Both Hands and again with a comfortable tempo.
7. Now pull out that Metronome, start working your way to the correct tempo. 
 
6 steps to practicing a piece on trumpet:
 
1. Always check on what Key Signature you are in, rather you are in a Major key or a Minor key, also     make sure to check to see if you have any flat’s (b), sharp’s (#) or natural’s.
2. Next would be what Time Signature you are in, rather its 4/4, 3/4, or 2/4 ect ….
3. Now check on the Tempo it is asking for, like “Adagio, Andante, Moderato and or Allegro" ect … 
4. For Trumpet Player's start going very slow and tongue everything. 
5. Next I would cut the piece in half; work on the part’s that you are having problems with in a                     comfortable tempo. 
6. Then go back to the beginning of the piece, pull out your Metronome. Start working your way to the      correct tempo. 
 
Notes:
 
Remember to always use a Metronome, for beginner Piano Player's say the letter note names out loud. You should always find the hardest part of the piece and play it like 3 times or more to make sure you have it down.  Always allow yourself time to practice for 30 minutes to 1 hour for any beginner piano player. Remember to take breaks in your daily practice, for 30 minutes take a 10 minute break, for 1 hour take a 30 minute break. This will help you refocus your mind on the music when you take a break from the piece you are working on. I would never practice no more than 30 minutes to 1 hour everyday with one day off. 
For Trumpet Player's, allow yourself time to rest in your daily practice. If you practice for 30 minutes then you should rest for 10 minutes, if you practice for 1 hour then rest for 30 minutes, if you practice for 2 hours then I would take three 30 minutes breaks but you should never practice no more than 30 minutes to 1 hour everyday with a one day off. This applies to beginners trumpet players. Not only will it help you refocus on the music when you take breaks but it will also help you with your lips not getting so tried so easy. And remember to always use a Metronome!

Pratice for kids

1st: Check what Clefs you are in. Rather in Treble Clef, Bass Clef or both.
 
2nd: What Time Signature you are in, 4/4, 3/4 or 2/4?
 
3rd: What Key Signature you are in, "C Major, G Major or F major."
 
4th: Count your rhythm/Clap the rhythm.
5th: Do Right Hand "RH" first then Left Hand "LH" and then Both Hands "BH" with saying the name of the notes out loud
6th: Which is second to last add your tempo "Cheerfully"
 
7th:Now to go along with number 6. Once you have done 1 - 6 very will. Once you know you are good at everything (1-6) Now you may add the Metronome last.
Start off slow then work your way up to the correct tempo your music is asking for.
 
** Notes:
When you are practicing these (1-7) steps can help you with your everyday practice. When you are practicing on your own I recommend you cut the music in half. Only do just a few Measures at a time, once you have done all the measures then go back to the hardest part of the song/piece an do it over and over as many time as you need to help you understand it. As example: If Measure 4 and 5 are the hardest part of the music then start there when practicing, go over it like 3 times or until you understand it. If you still don't understand it then stop take a break and do something else, then go back to measure 4 and 5. Keep trying to work on those two measures over and over until you get it. Once you have finally understood everything that you need to know about your music you may start at the beginning of the song/piece, by now you can pull out that Metronome and start off at a slow Tempo then work your way up to the correct tempo your music is asking for. Oh don't forget always have a GOOD PENCIL!
 
Copyright@2017;makingmusic;musikaparaninos;JWattsMusica


Single, Triple, Double Tonguing

1) "Single Tonguing",

Play in cut time.  Use the syllables “Tee - Tee - Tee, Ta - Ta - Ta, Tu - Tu - Tu, Da - Da - Da, Du - Du - Du, Thu - Thu - Thu, Lu - Lu - Lu, and Hu - Hu - Hu (breath attacks).”  in the order given for now (you will later be able to mix and match the order as needed).  Make sure you are using pronounced, confident resonating consonants. Practice them at different dynamic levels from very soft attacks to brilliant, crisp attacks and at speeds ranging from slow to quite fast.

Work your way onward through these.  Play perfectly and cleanly.  Speed is a result, not a goal.  Many perfect repetitions will bring about a quicker, lighter delivery.  Stay precise.

Do a few of these before going on to...

2) "Triple Tonguing"

Beginning these step and leap-wise exercises! Goal of all this, one is hard work. To make you’re “Ku” as strong as you’re “Tu” to develop coordination of “triple and double tonguing” patterns.  Use pronounced, strong, resonating consonants as above.  You may want to strongly accent the 'foreign' syllable at first. Play with a metronome start off slow then add more to the tempo, play only  as fast as you can play without losing you’re clear “Ku” or without tripping up on the articulation patters.

Do a few of these before going on. 

3) "Double Tonguing"

Practice whispering “tu-ku tu-ku tu-ku ... “over and over to train the tongue to move in the double tonguing pattern. Very strict and even; use a metronome.  Keep Ku's solid.  Remember: Clarity, then speed. Use pronounced, confident resonating consonants. 

Do a few of these and go on.

4) "Few Notes"

Notes on Tonguing syllables.  Although we have used syllables like Tu and Ku throughout, you will find that the tongue naturally drops in the low register to more of a Ta and Ka.  In the higher register, the tongue will raise, making the syllable more of Tee Kee.  In all cases, make sure the tip of the tongue is not hitting between the lips.  For less percussive attacks, use Du Gu or even Lu Gu for almost no separation. These softer syllables are great in quiet jazz ballads.

After your tongue is strong, you can start to back off, practicing in these more legato styles and softer dynamic levels.

Now, look for applications in your playing and practicing!

Written by JWATTS

Exercise by ITG

Exercise No. 1 (Gah syllable) Play slowly on mouthpiece and trumpet until comfortable. Connect the syllables but make each attack crisp and clean.

Exercise No. 2 The goal is to make the "gahs" equal to the "dahs". Try to keep the pitch exactly the same throughout the exercise.

Exercise No. 3 (slow double tongue) Again, make all attacks as even as possible. Accuracy over speed!

Exercise No. 4 Gradually increase the speed and go as fast as you can. This may be the only time you will ever hear a teacher say this! In order to reach a tempo that is useful, you must constantly try to move forward. Practice this exercise at least several weeks.

It is crucial to practice the following exercises with a metronome. 
Inexpensive metronomes can be purchased for about twenty dollars. Progress charts are indicated to help chart your progress. (Cross out tempo marks as you reach them.) These are merely suggested ranges of tempo marks. It's okay if you need to start slower than indicated or move in smaller steps! Observe all repeats.

Exercise No. 5 Notice the syllables used. It will not be possible to maintain fast speeds in the first ("dahs" only) or second ("gahs") groups, because you are not using both syllables.

Exercise No. 6 This exercise will help your double tongue endurance and increase the number of notes you can double tongue without getting "tongue tied". This is particularly useful in the many cornet solos in our literature.

Exercise No. 7 (1x single tongue, 2x double tongue) Above 140 double tongue only, but still take the repeat. Now we move beyond double tonguing on a single note and must coordinate valve changes and the tongue.

Copyright @ ITG/International Trumpet Guild

 

 

 

Do I have to pratice? Ahh Miss really? How long did you say I should PRACITCE?

I get a lot of students that ask me that question all the time. "How long did you say I should PRATICE? Do I have to practice? What, practice everyday? Ah why Miss?

How do you practice? Some people say to practice for 1 to 3 hrs, others say to practice for 30 to 45 mins. I would say for students age 4-6 you must practice for 15 minutes everyday. Now for students who are the age of 7-13 should practice for 30 minutes. Now if you have a student who is 14-older then 1 hour of practice would be great. As you become a college student or adult you may practice as many minutes or hours you like or what makes you feel good. Now you say how should one practice? We all practice differently and some just need 45 or 1 hours some like to practice for hours. For me I love to practice a total of 3 hours through out the day. I have a friend "Kiku Collins "who plays pro-trumpet, she told me "I don't have time to practice but when I do, I make it a very important practice." I work on what needs more work on then stuff I already know. You practice the way you think is right for yourself. Some people practice for hours others just for 30 to 45 mins. Not one person can have to many method books. You can always find a method book that works for you.

So how do you practice, what do you practice on? That is the question I get a lot from a lot of students. I work on lips slurs, Embouchure ...and things in between. This is for French horn/Trumpet. If for ex: if I had a song I am working on, I find the part of the song that is hard and turn it into a workout for me on my trumpet or I find method books that well help me understand my music.

Other key points to look at is if you are in some type of Jazz band or some other type of band. You are at practice or if you teach music lessons you are still in the practice stage. Like I still my students "Practices and you can go far."

What do you think would make you a better trumpet player? Just because you practice for hours you think it well make you a better trumpet player. No its the fact that you must have a good 1 hour practice to be a better trumpet player. Work on things that need more working on. Like I work on my lip slurs. What do you work on? To become a better trumpet, how I see it is you must first know you well not always get it right the first time ect.. unless you are a great at reading music for the first time. Shot I would said people that can do that are the ones who been playing trumpet for over 30 years. haha! Then once you know what parts on your trumpet, music you need to work on then spend more time working on that then later on the stuff you already know. I had a teacher once told me make your practice the best way that fits you. 

So if you would like to chat or need more advice just send me a message. I well get back to you in one business day!

Steps to a good practice

7 steps to practicing a piece on piano:
 
1. Always check on what Key Signature you are in, rather you are in a Major key or a Minor key, also    make sure to check to see if you have any flat’s (b), sharp’s (#) or natural’s.
2. Next would be what Time Signature you are in, rather its 4/4, 3/4, or 2/4 ect ….
3. Now check on the Tempo it is asking for, like “Adagio, Andante, Moderato and or Allegro" ect …  
4. For Piano Player’s start with just your Right Hand until you get it down solid with a comfortable           tempo so start off with like a very slow tempo.
5. Then next step is just Left Hand, until you get that down solid with a comfortable tempo.
6. Then go ahead and use Both Hands and again with a comfortable tempo.
7. Now pull out that Metronome, start working your way to the correct tempo. 
 
6 steps to practicing a piece on trumpet:
 
1. Always check on what Key Signature you are in, rather you are in a Major key or a Minor key, also     make sure to check to see if you have any flat’s (b), sharp’s (#) or natural’s.
2. Next would be what Time Signature you are in, rather its 4/4, 3/4, or 2/4 ect ….
3. Now check on the Tempo it is asking for, like “Adagio, Andante, Moderato and or Allegro" ect … 
4. For Trumpet Player's start going very slow and tongue everything. 
5. Next I would cut the piece in half; work on the part’s that you are having problems with in a                     comfortable tempo. 
6. Then go back to the beginning of the piece, pull out your Metronome. Start working your way to the      correct tempo. 
 
Notes:
 
Remember to always use a Metronome, for beginner Piano Player's say the letter note names out loud. You should always find the hardest part of the piece and play it like 3 times or more to make sure you have it down.  Always allow yourself time to practice for 30 minutes to 1 hour for any beginner piano player. Remember to take breaks in your daily practice, for 30 minutes take a 10 minute break, for 1 hour take a 30 minute break. This will help you refocus your mind on the music when you take a break from the piece you are working on. I would never practice no more than 30 minutes to 1 hour everyday with one day off. 
For Trumpet Player's, allow yourself time to rest in your daily practice. If you practice for 30 minutes then you should rest for 10 minutes, if you practice for 1 hour then rest for 30 minutes, if you practice for 2 hours then I would take three 30 minutes breaks but you should never practice no more than 30 minutes to 1 hour everyday with a one day off. This applies to beginners trumpet players. Not only will it help you refocus on the music when you take breaks but it will also help you with your lips not getting so tried so easy. And remember to always use a Metronome!

Pratice for kids

1st: Check what Clefs you are in. Rather in Treble Clef, Bass Clef or both.
 
2nd: What Time Signature you are in, 4/4, 3/4 or 2/4?
 
3rd: What Key Signature you are in, "C Major, G Major or F major."
 
4th: Count your rhythm/Clap the rhythm.
5th: Do Right Hand "RH" first then Left Hand "LH" and then Both Hands "BH" with saying the name of the notes out loud
6th: Which is second to last add your tempo "Cheerfully"
 
7th:Now to go along with number 6. Once you have done 1 - 6 very will. Once you know you are good at everything (1-6) Now you may add the Metronome last.
Start off slow then work your way up to the correct tempo your music is asking for.
 
** Notes:
When you are practicing these (1-7) steps can help you with your everyday practice. When you are practicing on your own I recommend you cut the music in half. Only do just a few Measures at a time, once you have done all the measures then go back to the hardest part of the song/piece an do it over and over as many time as you need to help you understand it. As example: If Measure 4 and 5 are the hardest part of the music then start there when practicing, go over it like 3 times or until you understand it. If you still don't understand it then stop take a break and do something else, then go back to measure 4 and 5. Keep trying to work on those two measures over and over until you get it. Once you have finally understood everything that you need to know about your music you may start at the beginning of the song/piece, by now you can pull out that Metronome and start off at a slow Tempo then work your way up to the correct tempo your music is asking for. Oh don't forget always have a GOOD PENCIL!
 
Copyright@2017;makingmusic;musikaparaninos;JWattsMusica

Music Blogs

Single, Triple, Double Tonguing

1) "Single Tonguing",

Play in cut time.  Use the syllables “Tee - Tee - Tee, Ta - Ta - Ta, Tu - Tu - Tu, Da - Da - Da, Du - Du - Du, Thu - Thu - Thu, Lu - Lu - Lu, and Hu - Hu - Hu (breath attacks).”  in the order given for now (you will later be able to mix and match the order as needed).  Make sure you are using pronounced, confident resonating consonants. Practice them at different dynamic levels from very soft attacks to brilliant, crisp attacks and at speeds ranging from slow to quite fast.

Work your way onward through these.  Play perfectly and cleanly.  Speed is a result, not a goal.  Many perfect repetitions will bring about a quicker, lighter delivery.  Stay precise.

Do a few of these before going on to...

2) "Triple Tonguing"

Beginning these step and leap-wise exercises! Goal of all this, one is hard work. To make you’re “Ku” as strong as you’re “Tu” to develop coordination of “triple and double tonguing” patterns.  Use pronounced, strong, resonating consonants as above.  You may want to strongly accent the 'foreign' syllable at first. Play with a metronome start off slow then add more to the tempo, play only  as fast as you can play without losing you’re clear “Ku” or without tripping up on the articulation patters.

Do a few of these before going on. 

3) "Double Tonguing"

Practice whispering “tu-ku tu-ku tu-ku ... “over and over to train the tongue to move in the double tonguing pattern. Very strict and even; use a metronome.  Keep Ku's solid.  Remember: Clarity, then speed. Use pronounced, confident resonating consonants. 

Do a few of these and go on.

4) "Few Notes"

Notes on Tonguing syllables.  Although we have used syllables like Tu and Ku throughout, you will find that the tongue naturally drops in the low register to more of a Ta and Ka.  In the higher register, the tongue will raise, making the syllable more of Tee Kee.  In all cases, make sure the tip of the tongue is not hitting between the lips.  For less percussive attacks, use Du Gu or even Lu Gu for almost no separation. These softer syllables are great in quiet jazz ballads.

After your tongue is strong, you can start to back off, practicing in these more legato styles and softer dynamic levels.

Now, look for applications in your playing and practicing!

Written by JWATTS

Exercise by ITG

Exercise No. 1 (Gah syllable) Play slowly on mouthpiece and trumpet until comfortable. Connect the syllables but make each attack crisp and clean.

Exercise No. 2 The goal is to make the "gahs" equal to the "dahs". Try to keep the pitch exactly the same throughout the exercise.

Exercise No. 3 (slow double tongue) Again, make all attacks as even as possible. Accuracy over speed!

Exercise No. 4 Gradually increase the speed and go as fast as you can. This may be the only time you will ever hear a teacher say this! In order to reach a tempo that is useful, you must constantly try to move forward. Practice this exercise at least several weeks.

It is crucial to practice the following exercises with a metronome. 
Inexpensive metronomes can be purchased for about twenty dollars. Progress charts are indicated to help chart your progress. (Cross out tempo marks as you reach them.) These are merely suggested ranges of tempo marks. It's okay if you need to start slower than indicated or move in smaller steps! Observe all repeats.

Exercise No. 5 Notice the syllables used. It will not be possible to maintain fast speeds in the first ("dahs" only) or second ("gahs") groups, because you are not using both syllables.

Exercise No. 6 This exercise will help your double tongue endurance and increase the number of notes you can double tongue without getting "tongue tied". This is particularly useful in the many cornet solos in our literature.

Exercise No. 7 (1x single tongue, 2x double tongue) Above 140 double tongue only, but still take the repeat. Now we move beyond double tonguing on a single note and must coordinate valve changes and the tongue.

Copyright @ ITG/International Trumpet Guild

 

 

 

Do I have to pratice? Ahh Miss really? How long did you say I should PRACITCE?

I get a lot of students that ask me that question all the time. "How long did you say I should PRATICE? Do I have to practice? What, practice everyday? Ah why Miss?

How do you practice? Some people say to practice for 1 to 3 hrs, others say to practice for 30 to 45 mins. I would say for students age 4-6 you must practice for 15 minutes everyday. Now for students who are the age of 7-13 should practice for 30 minutes. Now if you have a student who is 14-older then 1 hour of practice would be great. As you become a college student or adult you may practice as many minutes or hours you like or what makes you feel good. Now you say how should one practice? We all practice differently and some just need 45 or 1 hours some like to practice for hours. For me I love to practice a total of 3 hours through out the day. I have a friend "Kiku Collins "who plays pro-trumpet, she told me "I don't have time to practice but when I do, I make it a very important practice." I work on what needs more work on then stuff I already know. You practice the way you think is right for yourself. Some people practice for hours others just for 30 to 45 mins. Not one person can have to many method books. You can always find a method book that works for you.

So how do you practice, what do you practice on? That is the question I get a lot from a lot of students. I work on lips slurs, Embouchure ...and things in between. This is for French horn/Trumpet. If for ex: if I had a song I am working on, I find the part of the song that is hard and turn it into a workout for me on my trumpet or I find method books that well help me understand my music.

Other key points to look at is if you are in some type of Jazz band or some other type of band. You are at practice or if you teach music lessons you are still in the practice stage. Like I still my students "Practices and you can go far."

What do you think would make you a better trumpet player? Just because you practice for hours you think it well make you a better trumpet player. No its the fact that you must have a good 1 hour practice to be a better trumpet player. Work on things that need more working on. Like I work on my lip slurs. What do you work on? To become a better trumpet, how I see it is you must first know you well not always get it right the first time ect.. unless you are a great at reading music for the first time. Shot I would said people that can do that are the ones who been playing trumpet for over 30 years. haha! Then once you know what parts on your trumpet, music you need to work on then spend more time working on that then later on the stuff you already know. I had a teacher once told me make your practice the best way that fits you. 

So if you would like to chat or need more advice just send me a message. I well get back to you in one business day!

Steps to a good practice

7 steps to practicing a piece on piano:
 
1. Always check on what Key Signature you are in, rather you are in a Major key or a Minor key, also    make sure to check to see if you have any flat’s (b), sharp’s (#) or natural’s.
2. Next would be what Time Signature you are in, rather its 4/4, 3/4, or 2/4 ect ….
3. Now check on the Tempo it is asking for, like “Adagio, Andante, Moderato and or Allegro" ect …  
4. For Piano Player’s start with just your Right Hand until you get it down solid with a comfortable           tempo so start off with like a very slow tempo.
5. Then next step is just Left Hand, until you get that down solid with a comfortable tempo.
6. Then go ahead and use Both Hands and again with a comfortable tempo.
7. Now pull out that Metronome, start working your way to the correct tempo. 
 
6 steps to practicing a piece on trumpet:
 
1. Always check on what Key Signature you are in, rather you are in a Major key or a Minor key, also     make sure to check to see if you have any flat’s (b), sharp’s (#) or natural’s.
2. Next would be what Time Signature you are in, rather its 4/4, 3/4, or 2/4 ect ….
3. Now check on the Tempo it is asking for, like “Adagio, Andante, Moderato and or Allegro" ect … 
4. For Trumpet Player's start going very slow and tongue everything. 
5. Next I would cut the piece in half; work on the part’s that you are having problems with in a                     comfortable tempo. 
6. Then go back to the beginning of the piece, pull out your Metronome. Start working your way to the      correct tempo. 
 
Notes:
 
Remember to always use a Metronome, for beginner Piano Player's say the letter note names out loud. You should always find the hardest part of the piece and play it like 3 times or more to make sure you have it down.  Always allow yourself time to practice for 30 minutes to 1 hour for any beginner piano player. Remember to take breaks in your daily practice, for 30 minutes take a 10 minute break, for 1 hour take a 30 minute break. This will help you refocus your mind on the music when you take a break from the piece you are working on. I would never practice no more than 30 minutes to 1 hour everyday with one day off. 
For Trumpet Player's, allow yourself time to rest in your daily practice. If you practice for 30 minutes then you should rest for 10 minutes, if you practice for 1 hour then rest for 30 minutes, if you practice for 2 hours then I would take three 30 minutes breaks but you should never practice no more than 30 minutes to 1 hour everyday with a one day off. This applies to beginners trumpet players. Not only will it help you refocus on the music when you take breaks but it will also help you with your lips not getting so tried so easy. And remember to always use a Metronome!

Pratice for kids

1st: Check what Clefs you are in. Rather in Treble Clef, Bass Clef or both.
 
2nd: What Time Signature you are in, 4/4, 3/4 or 2/4?
 
3rd: What Key Signature you are in, "C Major, G Major or F major."
 
4th: Count your rhythm/Clap the rhythm.
5th: Do Right Hand "RH" first then Left Hand "LH" and then Both Hands "BH" with saying the name of the notes out loud
6th: Which is second to last add your tempo "Cheerfully"
 
7th:Now to go along with number 6. Once you have done 1 - 6 very will. Once you know you are good at everything (1-6) Now you may add the Metronome last.
Start off slow then work your way up to the correct tempo your music is asking for.
 
** Notes:
When you are practicing these (1-7) steps can help you with your everyday practice. When you are practicing on your own I recommend you cut the music in half. Only do just a few Measures at a time, once you have done all the measures then go back to the hardest part of the song/piece an do it over and over as many time as you need to help you understand it. As example: If Measure 4 and 5 are the hardest part of the music then start there when practicing, go over it like 3 times or until you understand it. If you still don't understand it then stop take a break and do something else, then go back to measure 4 and 5. Keep trying to work on those two measures over and over until you get it. Once you have finally understood everything that you need to know about your music you may start at the beginning of the song/piece, by now you can pull out that Metronome and start off at a slow Tempo then work your way up to the correct tempo your music is asking for. Oh don't forget always have a GOOD PENCIL!
 
Copyright@2017;makingmusic;musikaparaninos;JWattsMusica

Search here

Archives